Office of the Arizona Governor Doug Ducey
Governor's Office of Youth, Faith and Family
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Title

Addiction: The Elephant in the Room

Prevention

Working ourselves out of a job one drug free person at a time

LEARN MORE ABOUT PREVENTION

Treatment

Because you’re worth saving

LEARN MORE ABOUT TREATMENT

Recovery

Loving your future one day at a time

LEARN MORE ABOUT RECOVERY

Wellness & Recovery

The Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith and Family (GOYFF) seeks to educate all Arizona’s communities about substance abuse, the disease of addiction and the stigma associated with addiction.  GOYFF envisions an Arizona where substance abuse is treated as a significant public health issue and recovery is recognized as valuable to all Arizonans.  We believe that prevention works, treatment is effective and people recover.  GOYFF hopes that those in attendance and the community in general begin to “care” about this segment of the population by changing perceptions and noting that addiction happens to “good” people.  Additionally, GOYFF wants attendees to take away from the event an education that prevention is a much better and cost effective means of dealing with this issue, as well as an understanding that recovery looks different for everyone. 

Going Forward

The Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith and Family collaborates with a group of volunteer community members who comprise the Now You See Me – Subcommittee.  These members support GOYFF not only with community engagement, but with promotion of on-going initiatives which focus on prevention, intervention, treatment and recovery.  Additionally, the Subcommittee will cooperate with GOYFF in preparing as an annual event, Addiction; The Elephant in the Room.

What's Trending

Addiction in America: By the Numbers

The abuse of tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs costs the U.S. $700 billion annually in costs related to crime, lost work productivity and health care.